Don't get discouraged with your first auction. It takes a good sense of what a vehicle is worth, and the ability to think fast-plus some luck and common sense-to get a good deal. Watch the seasoned bidders at work to catch the gist of it. If you're a smart bidder, government auctions can be a good place to find an inexpensive second car or work truck. Just remember: any deal that seems to be too good to be true probably is!
Police auctions tend to conjure up images of beat up cars confiscated from drug dealers and mint condition police cruisers that—for one reason or another—never saw service. The reality lies somewhere in the middle, and there are some good deals to be had so long as you're careful, and absolutely sure about what you're doing. Let this list be your insurance.
Count Boulder police among the fans. They started using PropertyRoom.com in 2007, mainly to unload found property that couldn’t be traced back to the owners. Items usually are kept from four months to three years, and they are posted on the police department’s Web site for four weeks before they are put up for auction, said spokeswoman Sarah Huntley.
Eklund Farm Machinery Used Equipment + Consignment Auction   Saturday, March 9, 2019 at 9:00 AM 27696 New York 23, Stamford, NYLive with Online Bidding   Selling: Tractors; Skid Steer Loaders; Lawn Equipment; Utility Vehicles; Large Supply of Planting, Tilling, Haying, and Harvest Equipment.  Accepting Consignments March 4-7, 8:00am to   [ View Full Listing ]
The Sheriff makes no representations on the functionality, safety and recalls of the vehicles auctioned. Potential purchasers are strongly encouraged to conduct their own research on the history of the vehicles they wish to bid on. Vehicle safety recall information can be researched at https://vinrcl.safercar.gov/vin/ .The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) site lets you enter a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to learn if a specific vehicle has not been repaired as part of a safety recall in the last 15 years. Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) are provided in the Sheriff’s Sale notices for all vehicles sold in the Upcoming Auction(s) section of this webpage.

The goods you buy from government auctions are “as is.” Look on the “Terms and Conditions” page before bidding to understand the process. A typical auction page states, for example, that the auction site doesn’t guarantee the quality of the product in any way. Once you bid, you enter a legally binding contract, and you need to follow through with your bid.
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