When the car that you want to bid on goes up for auction, pay attention because the bidding will go very fast. Raise your hand up to bid. If the auctioneer doesn’t immediately see you, shout “Yes.” Once the auctioneer acknowledges your bid, he’ll turn to look for a counter bid. Then he’ll turn back to you to see if you’ll bid again. Keep shouting “Yes” when he returns to you to continue bidding. If you’d like to stop bidding, just shake your head “No” when the auctioneer turns to you.
Remember, you aren’t allowed to drive these vehicles, but you are granted access to them prior to the auction, and getting up close can reveal all kinds of hidden maladies. Look for things like paint overspray, uneven sheet metal, compromised suspension components, undercarriage rust, and anything else that looks out of place. Interior aroma is another major thing to watch out for, so be wary of things like gasoline aromas and mildew, because even though they may dissipate eventually, there’s a strong chance they represent a much larger issue.
Selling for Cities and Counties: POLICE EVIDENCE Over 500 Items of Assorted Police Evidence from Local Police Departments Consisting of: Tools, Jewelry, Car Stereos, Cell Phones, Televisions, Cameras, Watches, Toys, Etc. COMPUTERS & OFFICE FURNITURE Computers, Printers, Office Copiers, Wood & Metal Desks, Bookcases, 2 & 4-Drawer File Cabinets, Lateral File Cabinets, Metal Shelving, Executive & Secretarial Chairs, Office Side Chairs, More!
 The goods you buy from government auctions are “as is.” Look on the “Terms and Conditions” page before bidding to understand the process. A typical auction page states, for example, that the auction site doesn’t guarantee the quality of the product in any way. Once you bid, you enter a legally binding contract, and you need to follow through with your bid. 
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