APPOINTMENTS: Property is released by appointment only beginning December 1, 2017. There is no charge to sign up on Eventbrite. Our switch to a reservation system better serves our community with shorter wait times. Be sure keep track of your appointment time confirmation emailed to you. We recommend that you print this out or have it available on a mobile device. The time you have reserved is on the lower half of the ticket. We cannot take residents for a time in which you have not been scheduled.
After over 40 years as a family owned restaurant and staple of Golden the owners of The Briarwood Inn have decided to move on to other life adventures. This public online auction to include: heating and cooking equipment, roll in convection oven, refrigeration, plating and catering for large banquets, smallwares, dining tables and chairs, bar equipment, wine cellar racks, chandeliers, imported antiques, patio furniture, fountains, outdoor lighting, sheds and a Large digital outdoor street sign.
Throughout the year, property that has been collected at various buildings and property that residents find are turned into the police station. After certain periods of time, as specified by law and after attempting to locate an owner or hoping the owner will call us looking for it, the Evidence Section may dispose of property that is no longer required to be stored. In the past, the Evidence Section in conjunction with the UCF Student Government would conduct an on-campus auction where this type property was auctioned to the highest bidder. Today, the UCF Police Department utilizes the services of Propertyroom.com an online auction site specializing in property from police agencies across the country, to auction off all of our abandoned, stolen, lawfully seized, or unclaimed property of all types, remaining unclaimed for 30 days or more. This is an ongoing auction available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Items being auctioned included electronics, jewelry, clothing, bicycles, tools, sporting equipment and other items. The official web site is www.propertyroom.com.
The Sheriff makes no representations on the functionality, safety and recalls of the vehicles auctioned. Potential purchasers are strongly encouraged to conduct their own research on the history of the vehicles they wish to bid on. Vehicle safety recall information can be researched at https://vinrcl.safercar.gov/vin/ .The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) site lets you enter a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to learn if a specific vehicle has not been repaired as part of a safety recall in the last 15 years. Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) are provided in the Sheriff’s Sale notices for all vehicles sold in the Upcoming Auction(s) section of this webpage. 

But that doesn’t mean there still aren’t good deals to be had at local auctions, because as intimidating as it may sound, there’s a reason dedicated bidders still show up to these things every week. You just have to remain skeptical and attentive if you want to take home the right ride, because you never know what might show up, and by using these 10 tips, you might land a gem.
After 34 Years of service Cheytruck Parts Hudson will be closing down and selling all of its remaining assets via public online auction. Including: Van Body Trailers, Truck Cargo Boxes, Chevy Emblems and Chevy Collectibles, Pallet Racking and Shelving, Chevy Truck Parts, Truck Beds and Flat Beds, Air Compressors, Tool Boxes and Gang Boxes, Warehouse Ladders, Tools and Support Equipment, Office Furniture, and Much More!

The New York City Police Department regularly holds online auctions to dispose of seized, unclaimed property and vehicles. The Property Clerk Division works with an outside auctioneer, called Property Room, which specializes in items seized by law enforcement agencies across the country. Online auctions include many high-end items, such as jewelry, rare coins, brand-name clothing, and consumer electronics. Vehicles are also available. Participation in online auctions is free and open to the general public.
The Sheriff makes no representations on the functionality, safety and recalls of the vehicles auctioned. Potential purchasers are strongly encouraged to conduct their own research on the history of the vehicles they wish to bid on. Vehicle safety recall information can be researched at https://vinrcl.safercar.gov/vin/ .The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) site lets you enter a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to learn if a specific vehicle has not been repaired as part of a safety recall in the last 15 years. Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) are provided in the Sheriff’s Sale notices for all vehicles sold in the Upcoming Auction(s) section of this webpage. 

Always take a photo of the vehicle identification number (VIN) toward the base of the windshield on cars you want to bid on at auctions. After that, walk around and check places like door jams, under the hood, and inside trunk lids, where stickers with this number may also appear. If the numbers don’t match up, or are missing entirely it’s best to move on, because there’s probably a really bad reason why it’s like that.
The bidding started out fairly tame. Individuals there bought a beat up Impala for $525, a Chevy Astro van for $425, and the shittiest Chrysler PT Cruiser I have ever seen for $300. As for the awesome Ford Escort wagon? Well, it didn’t do so hot, in part, Kevin told me, because it’s so light and has low scrap value, and because parts are in low demand:
Laura Agadoni has been writing professionally since 1983. Her feature stories on area businesses, human interest and health and fitness appear in her local newspaper. She has also written and edited for a grassroots outreach effort and has been published in "Clean Eating" magazine and in "Dimensions" magazine, a CUNA Mutual publication. Agadoni has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from California State University-Fullerton.
After 40 years in Business on the corner of Buchtel Blvd and South Pearl Street, Buchtel Motors will be closing and selling their remaining assets at public Auction. Auction will include, (2) Vehicles, Western 9,000 lb 2-Post Lift, (2) Rotary 7,000 lb 2- Post Lifts, Rotary 9,000 Lb Inground Smart Lift, Hunter Tire Changer, Hunter Wheel Balancer, Ammco Brake Lathe, Shops tools and Equipment, Storage Cabinets and Work Benches, Porcelain Automotive Signs, Office equipment, Ipads and assorted inventory.
A seized property auction refers to the sale of property that has been seized by the state or local government. The sale of the property is overseen by state or municipal government officials, and usually takes place where the property itself isolated. This usually takes place in connection with a foreclosure by judicial sale or judicial lien, but it can also involve other laws as well (such a criminal drug case).
Over the years, we’ve built long-standing relationships with our customers, ranging from large financial institutions to small local dealers. We gladly tailor our auto auction services to each of our clients, providing just the right type and amount of support. From transportation and reconditioning, to promotion and inventory, and even to marshaling and other specialty services, we make sure our buyers and sellers are well taken care of throughout the dealer auction process.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Please be advised that you may experience a short wait time. Please also be advised that there may be some instances where the Property and Evidence staff may be called away from the Safety and Justice Building to assist with off-site support for crime scene investigations. If this happens on the day of your appointment, we apologize in advance. Please schedule a new appointment. 

Several different federal agencies hold government auctions. The General Services Administration is the granddaddy of them all, because it sells on behalf of other departments. When a federal agency no longer needs something — say, a pickup truck — it reports the truck to GSA, which first offers it to other federal agencies and then to state and local governments or nonprofits. If nobody claims the truck, then the GSA auctions it off to the public, and you get your chance at it. 

A seized property auction refers to the sale of property that has been seized by the state or local government. The sale of the property is overseen by state or municipal government officials, and usually takes place where the property itself isolated. This usually takes place in connection with a foreclosure by judicial sale or judicial lien, but it can also involve other laws as well (such a criminal drug case).
The public may view the vehicles from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. the day of the auction. In order to bid on a vehicle, you must be registered with the Impound Lot before 9 a.m. on the day of auction. Registrations will not be processed after 9 a.m. There is a $5 fee to obtain a bidder number for the auction. You must be 18 or older to bid. Additional attendees with a bidder are $1 each, including children. One person in each party must register as a bidder. Everyone in your party must be present when the bidder registers in order to be allowed in for the attendee fee of $1. The bidder's name will be the name the Bill of Sale is printed in. This cannot be changed. 

A well-maintained car will always have a clean dipstick when you check the oil or transmission fluid, so if it’s anything other than light and transparent, be careful. Also be sure to inspect the coolant overflow tank and shine a flashlight inside the radiator. If it looks like someone accidentally dumped chocolate milk in there it’s time to walk away, because that’s the sign of a blown head gasket.
Additional government sites. There are a few additional sites that can provide tips on government auctions. Guide to Federal Auctions gives a rundown of the various agencies. It provides information about what they sell as well as the departments' websites. GSA supplies information about auction sources. Auctions can be searched by state or auction house
Private sources. In addition to these free government sites, you can use private sites. These sites provide information about federal and local government auctions. Gov-Auctions gives you access to both federal and state auctions. The sites charge a one-time fee of $39.00 for access to their information. Having all auctions on one site can be helpful. If you are launching a serious car search or buy auction cars on a frequent basis, paying to use this site might make financial sense
Do your research. Check Kelly Blue Book for the proper price for the vehicle, including its mileage and apparent condition. Always downgrade the condition by one ranking for government auctions. Also, do some smart used-car research, such as checking Consumer Reports for reliability and the frequencies of particular repairs, and checking our road test information if it's a recent model vehicle.
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