Yes. Before the auction, just put down a refundable $20 cash deposit at the cashier stand toward the entrance of the auction location. When the auction begins, pay attention. Bid by raising a hand or shouting “Yes” until you make eye contact with the auctioneer. If someone else counters your bid, you’ll have another opportunity to bid again. When you no longer want to bid, just shake your head or say “No” when the auctioneer returns to you. After the auction, you will either cash out and your $20 deposit will go toward your purchases or the deposit will be refunded.

Sitting on the couch, craft beer in hand, we salivate over the parade of shining classic cars rolling across the auction block at Barrett-Jackson, changing hands for ungodly globs of cold, hard cash. It’s places like this where you can pick up cars like custom built Singer Porsches, old-school hot rods, vintage Ferraris, and soon to be released, serial #001 supercars, and as the drinks get stronger, so too does the bidding.


In recent years, public auctions have become commonly referred to as “the mechanic’s auction,” where lots can quickly become a money pit for novice bidders. There is no guarantee on the authenticity of the mileage on the odometer here, and since it’s an auction, you can’t drive the vehicle prior to bidding on it. This is a place where flood vehicles sell for top dollar after being hastily reupholstered in the hopes of duping amateur bidders, and cars with bad engines come loaded with heavy-duty oil in order to ensure it doesn’t belch smoke or leak on the auction block.

In early 2015, we made the decision to help our clients auction this piece of property & evidence through innovative solutions that not only fulfills this requirement for many agencies, but also supports public safety as in many jurisdictions the proceeds from these auctions can be used to purchase products like wearable body cameras, tactical gear and more.

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